My Flag

Jun 01

In Jewish Studies, we learned about what colors on flags represent. Using the knowledge that they meant something, we created our own flag and key. Here is my flag and key:

Chaim Weizmann חיים ויצמן

May 24

My class’ signature event was to research a famous person that we were assigned. Our Signature event was about the founding fathers and mothers of Israel and America. In General Studies, we learned how to write an informational essay. In Jewish Studies, we learned about the history and founding of Israel. I researched Chaim Weizmann using books, articles, and websites. I wrote an informative paper about him. I also made a portrait of Chaim Weizmann in art. We used Monochromatic painting. Monochromatic painting is using tints and shades. Tint is adding white to a color and shade is adding black. Here is the portrait:

Then I made an iMovie. Here it is:

My Reading Goals Fourth Quarter

Apr 09

My first goal is to keep books separate when I read more than one book at a time. I will do this by getting a sticky note and writing down the main things. For example, the protagonist or the genre. Then, when I mix them up, I can just flip to the front and know which one is which.

My second goal is to read one or two full books that are medium size, about one to two hundred pages, a week. I will do this by reading every night or if I don’t, making up for it the night after.

My last goal is to read in between the lines. I will do this by thinking of what the other characters might be thinking of or paying attention to what the author means.

Israel’s Achievements

Mar 23

Israel is one of the youngest western countries right now. It is almost 70 years old, really young compared to other countries. But, it has accomplished amazing things. I looked on this timeline to see Israel’s accomplishments. Here are four of my favorites:

In 1954 the first all-Israeli motion picture came out in Israel. It was called “Hill 24 Does Not Answer”. The next year, it was the first movie from Israel to enter the Cannes Film Festival. Later, Israel started being an amazing movie-making machine!

Then, in 1965, the Israel Museum became established. It is in Jerusalem. It’s really popular and now it is the largest in the region. Visit it soon!

The third achievement is getting Coca Cola in Israel in 1966. Who doesn’t like Coca Cola? I’d be ecstatic if I lived in Israel in 1966!

Then last but not least was the first TV broadcast in Israel. The 20th Independence Day military parade. How cool is that? The first TV broadcast in Israel was such an important thing!

זה לא אני

Mar 19

In class we read a book by Leah Goldberg called זה לא אני. We read it because we were learning about rhymes. Here’s a video of me reading it.

The Plague of Locusts מכת ארבה

Mar 15

In Jewish Studies, we are learning about the ten plagues. Now, we are learning about the plague of locusts (מכת ארבה). If you would like to learn about the other plagues, you could go to the link down below at the bottom of this post.

In this plague, God told Moses that God hardened Pharaoh’s heart on purpose so his plan could go on and because he wanted to show the Egyptians and the Israelites that he was powerful. He also told Moses to tell Pharaoh that later generations would talk about the plagues and tell the story. Moses went to Pharaoh and told him to let the Israelites go or else tomorrow, I mean tomorrow in the Torah; not tomorrow from today, there would be the worst locust swarms that have ever been in Egypt and that ever will be in Egypt.

So then Pharaoh’s workers told him that he should let the Israelites go. He listened and called Moses and Aaron over. He said, “Go and pray to God. Who will come?”

So then Moses answered, “The young people, the old people, our sheep, and our cattle will go.”

Pharaoh did not like that answer so he changed it. “Only the men will go. No one else.” And he sent them out.

That’s the stuff that happened before the actual plague. Now let’s get to the main story.

Moses raised his staff and all of a sudden a harsh gust of wind coming from the east swooped in with millions of locusts being carried with it. The locusts ate all of the crops that were left over from the plague of hail. Now, here comes Pharaoh with his lies. “I’ve done horrible things. Pray to God for me,” he said. So Moses did and along came a harsh gust of wind from the west, swooping in and snatching all the locusts away. But, the question is whether or not Pharaoh let the Jews go. Did he? No. God hardened Pharaoh’s heart and he did not let the Israelites go.

Why do you think God uses wind to transport the locusts?

The Plague of Hail מכת ברד

Metamorphosis

Mar 15

The Plague of Hail מכת ברד

Mar 09

In Jewish Studies, we are learning about the ten plagues. Now, we are learning about the plague of hail (מכת ברד). If you would like to learn about the other plagues, you could go to the link down below at the bottom of this post.

God told Moses to warn Pharaoh of 3 things. First, that the rest of the plagues were going to be horrible. Second, that Pharaoh didn’t die during the plague of dever because God wanted to show him and the Jews that He was powerful and full of miracles, just ready to burst out at any time when He needed them. Third, that there would be hard hail. So, whoever believed God took their animals and valuables inside.

Then God told Moses to lift his staff up to the sky and then there would be hail. So Moses told Pharoah the warnings and lifted his staff. As promised, hail poured down onto Egypt. The hail was the strongest hail that had ever been in Egypt and it was not ordinary. They were blocks of ice, but inside there was fire. A red fire glowed but did not melt the ice. The ice did not put out the fire. Rashi, the commentary, said that fire and ice made a truce and became friends.

So the hail crashed down on Egypt, but not even a block went on Goshen. Because that’s where the Jews lived. And because God wanted to show Pharaoh that it wasn’t a natural phenomenon, as if fire inside ice wasn’t enough.

Pharaoh said to Aaron and Moses,  “I have sinned. Pray to God for me.” Then Moses answered that he would.

So the plants and trees that were above ground level died, but the seeds and sprouts grew later, after the hail. They stayed alive.

Moses prayed and the hail stopped.

Pharaoh hardened his heart and did not let the Jews go.

This plague lasted a month. Well, at least commentaries think so. It affected the Egyptians, their plants, and their animals.

The Plague of Boils מכת

 

 

 

 

 

The Plague of Boils מכת שחין

Mar 01

In Jewish Studies, we are learning about the ten plagues. Now, we are learning about the plague of boils (מכת שחין). If you would like to learn about the other plagues, you could go to the link down below at the bottom of this post.

בעיברית אנחנו לומדים על עשר המכות. עכשו אנחנו לומדים על מכת שחין. אם אתם רוצים ללמוד על המכות אחרים אתם יכולים ללכת ללינק למתה של הפוסט הזה


No one knows for sure how long any of the plagues lasted except for the first plague, the plague of blood. That one lasted a week; it says it in the Torah. All of the others the commentaries guessed on. They think all the rest lasted a month.

Moses started this plague. It affected the Egyptians and their animals. God told Moses to throw burned ashes into the air in front of Pharaoh and every Egyptian and every one of their animals would get boils all over their bodies. So Moses went with Aaron to Pharaoh and exactly that happened. Pharaoh reacted horribly. God hardened Pharaoh’s heart. We’re not exactly sure why God did it, but Rashi thought that God did it because he had a plan and needed to make sure that all the Jews believed in him.

Why do you think God hardened Pharaoh’s heart?

The Plague of Disease of Livestock מכת דבר

The Plague of Disease of Livestock מכת דבר

Feb 23

In Jewish Studies, we are learning about the ten plagues. Now, we are learning about the plague of disease of livestock (מכת דבר). If you would like to learn about the other plagues, you could go to the link down below at the bottom of this post.

In this plague, all of the Egyptians’ animals die. Hold on, let me start from the beginning.

Unlike the first 3 plagues, Moses started this plague. First, God told Moses to warn Pharaoh to let the people go or else all of the Egyptians’ animals will die. But definitely not the Jews’. Their animals would live. Not one of them would die; not a single one.

Commentaries believe that the plague of disease of livestock lasted a month but no one knows for sure. The only thing we know is that the plague of blood lasted a week.

This plague affected the Egyptians and their animals. Pharaoh reacted to this plague pretty badly. After he heard that the Jews’ animals were not harmed, he hardened his heart and did not let the people go.

On a scale of one to ten, how much would you mourn for your pet if you were an Egyptian?

The Plague of Wild Animals מכת ערוב