“Happiness is neither virtue nor pleasure nor this thing nor that but simply growth, We are happy when we are growing.” -W. B. Yeats

“Happiness is neither virtue nor pleasure nor this thing nor that but simply growth, We are happy when we are growing.” -W. B. Yeats

InEdit Post ‹ Jamie — WordPress-1 Language Arts class, we are in the middle of learning a new unit on poetry. For this, instead of reading and talking about each individual poet, we were each assigned a famous poet to research and present to the class about. I was assigned W. B. Yeats as my poet. I found out a few things, one being that he was a very famous Irish poet.

On June 13, 1865 a star was born. W. B. Yeats was born in Dublin, Ireland, and grew up in County Sligo, London. He was raised by his mother, Susan Pollexfen, and his father, a well known Irish painter, John Butler. Yeats died at 73 years old in 1939 in Menton, France.

The diversity in W. B. Yeats’ poems are what make his work more interesting to readers. He wrote a variety of different poems with different meanings. Here is an example of the diversity of the poems:

There is a poem he wrote called “A Prayer for my Daughter” which from my perspective is about him trying to keep his daughter safe during an enormous storm.poets-corner-color There is also another poem called “The Fisherman” which is about a dream that this man had. It switches perspectives on how this “fisherman” was living his life. Each poem has it’s own way of getting the point across, and each one tells a different story. W. B. Yeats was also well known for him being an Irish Poet, plays he wrote.

In addition to this assignment, we have to find a poem by our assigned author (W. B. Yeats), recite it, and explain how you relate to it (below).

“THE girl goes dancing there

On the leaf-sown, new-mown, smoothballet_dancer_Clipart_Free

Grass plot of the garden;

Escaped from bitter youth,

Escaped out of her crowd,

Or out of her black cloud.

Ah, dancer, ah, sweet dancer.!

 

If strange men come from the house

To lead her away, do not say

That she is happy being crazy;

Lead them gently astray;

Let her finish her dance,

Let her finish her dance.

Ah, dancer, ah, sweet dancer.!”

-William Butler Yeats

 

I chose a poem called “Sweet Dancer” (Above). This poem is about how this dancer can get her mind off of problems and fears in the real world by dancing. The last couple of lines in the poem are:

“If strange men come from the house,

To lead her away, do not say

That she is happy being crazy;

Lead them gently astray;

Let her finish her dance,

Let her finish her dance…”

 

These lines sounds like (to me that) God is pushing back these people who want to interfere in her life so she could finish her dance; or finish her life happily. This relates to me because I am a dancer, and when I dance, I forget about reality because I am soaked into the music.

This unit on poetry has really helped me a lot. Although I have not learned about the class’s poems yet, I have took things into perspective. For one, a poem can mean a hundred different things depending on whose reading it, who’s comprehending it, and whose writing it. This I was not taught by a teacher. This is what I got out of it, which I thought was the point.

Image Credit: Mark A. Hicks, Laobc.

Information Credit:  http://www.poets.org/poet.php/prmPID/117 
http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/authors/w/william_butler_yeats.html#pORvruDRatr09mA6.99/
http://www.biography.com/people/william-butler-yeats-9538857

 

 

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