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The Battle of Gettysburg

Posted by on September 7, 2012

 

Here is an essay about the battle of Gettysburg. I hope you like it!

The battle

General Robert E. Lee concentrated his army around Gettysburg. On July 1, the confederates drove the union defenders to Cemetery Hill. Then, Lee struck the flanks of the union line resulting in severe fighting at Devils Den, Little Round Top, the Wheat Field, Peach Orchard, Culps Hill, and East Cemetery Hill. The confederates gained ground but failed to dislodge the union host. On July 3, fighting raged at Culps Hill. The union regained its lost ground. Lee attacked Union Center on Cemetery Ridge. He was repulsed with heavy losses in what is known as Pickett’s Charge. Lee’s second invasion in the north had failed.

Pickett’s Charge

Pickett’s Charge involved an infantry assault of 15,000 confederate soldiers against union general Meade’s troops along Cemetery Ridge.    THe assault would take nine brigades of confederate soldiers across a three quarter mile of open ground. The ill fated assault resulted in over 6,000 confederate casualties. This marked the end of the battle of Gettysburg as well as Lee’s last invasion in the north. This assault became known as Pickett’s Charge.

Aftermath of the war

On July 4, Lee started a 27 mile long train of Hospital Wagons to Virginia. The army stopped at the flooded Potomac River and entrenched for another battle. Meade’s army was also battered and had consumed much of its ammunition. The army of the Potomac did not pursue, for which Meade would be soundly criticized. Meade remained in command of the army for the rest of the war.

http://www.pics4learning.com/details.php?img=george_pickett_grave.jpg

3 Responses to The Battle of Gettysburg

  1. shelly zavon

    I like the picture you found and I enjoyed reading your post. I can’t wait to study the Civil War with our class this year. You seem to be very well-read about it. Hopefully, you will share your knowledge with me!

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